Gamification, a Tool to Beat Depression

A kid playing Donkey Kong Arcade
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Some weeks ago I stumbled upon a certain word that grabbed my interest (and is still keeping it) that I didn’t know about but in a certain way already had used throughout my life.

I’m talking about “Gamification” which on a simple definition is just the “action to game” something.

Nowadays is very well used among online marketers in ads for us to engage in playing some sort of game so they can redirect us to the webpage and download what they are promoting there (which ironically tends to be an app for a game).

A clear and easy way to use a form of gamification is when we create a scoring system around the completion of certain activities to ensure we achieve some sort of bigger goal.

Let’s see it from another perspective.

By using educational gamification a teacher can use elements of a game to teach students while maintaining an improved sense of enjoyment and hence the engagement and learning/teaching experience will be more smooth and effective.

How to Beat Depression by Using Gamification

Beating depression is not something we can do “accidentally”, we cannot just go with our lives “BAU” expecting that in one day depression will just disappear (that’s pretty obvious, right?)

What is not so obvious is how to battle that depression if we cannot fully trust our minds.

I mean, where would we start? What can we do?

Being honest, I’m not an expert in using this tool of gamification but at least I know where you could start using it to stack the table in your favor against depression.

The one thing I would recomend is to use a list of the things you need to do in a day (and/or week) and assign some fair points to the tasks.

I’ve written about how to use lists before, you can go and check it out here:

Once you start rolling the days completing at least the bare minimum you could add some more difficult tasks to the list that can have (though little) a meaningful and positive impact in your life over time.

Doing it like this will like beating the game… the game or recovering back your life from the claws of depression.

Conclusion

There are more things to know about gamification and this technique (or way of thinking) is very deep. And I know this can sound too simple to use and be considered something effective to fight depression, but in fact, the way to apply gamification is very simple and I truly believe in making things simpler to understand.

Depression is not something that you can defeat overnight, it is well known that time will be necessary to heal this condition and improve your life, that’s why I think using gamification as a way to see this fight like a game you can win, could create a new perspective on how to deal with depression and lastly to succeed in the game.